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Tech Talk Radio Show 46 of 2009
Transmission date: November 26, 2009

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Ep 46: Hands up all of you who knows what the difference is between IMAP and POP3. Hmmm thought so, so we thought with all these new mail clients these day a revisit to the world of email is timely. So to POP or not to POP that’s the question. Also tonight Microsoft denies Windows 7 modeled on Mac OS. Twitter suspends retweet service and we look at syncing devices iPhone iPhone to Outlook via Google.

November 16 , 2009

If you’re family is like mine, that is you have young children who just love watching the same movie over and over and over again, but don’t yet know about the care and maintenance of DVD media, then maybe it’s time to invest in a device which servers movies of a computer at the push of a button.

One thing that’s blatantly obvious is when it comes to technology, nothing is ever as simple as it first appears, and connecting a computer to a TV is no different, but things have become a little easier in recent times, and the investment in setup time and cash has also diminished. So if you’re looking to streamline the viewing of electronic media in the living room, then this could be a good holiday project over the next few months.

Last week I picked up a Western Digital TV Live box from the local white goods retailer. This sub $200 purchase caught my eye because at first glance it had everything thing I needed – HDMI, High Definition, fie serving and network connectivity both wireless and Ethernet. How good’s this I thought to myself, and for the price, I was prepared to take on the risk that it just may not perform as I had hoped. It even supports external USB devices and has two ports.

WDTV live Taking electricity for granted, the two most important connections you need close by to you home entertainment system is a coax point for the TV antenna, and Ethernet. Some of today’s modern TVs and Bluray players need internet access to extend range of content on offer. In fact, my home entertainment system has its own gigabit switch – decadent? Not really. Overkill? Definitely not.

I successfully connected my WDTV live box into the network using a spare port on the hub, and the HDMI cable straight into the TV, and guess what, it worked straight out of the box. Within moments of turning the device on, it had connected into the home domain and internet, and I was successfully watching an Avatar trailer in full HD which I’d downloaded of the Apple site earlier.  How easy was that! The WDTV live box also has a built in Youtube and Flikr viewer, so after frustratingly keying the words “Monty Python” in on the on screen keyboard, the family was whistling along to “Always look at the bright side of life” within seconds of clicking search.

In the next few weeks I’ll assess the WAF (Wife Acceptability Factor), as well as how well the kids take to it. It’s relatively simple to navigate your way around the device, but that’s for someone like me, and first impressions are very good. It was easy to set up and easy to operate, now to find a good DVD ripping package and find out what bugs lie hidden in version 1.0 software. Maybe finally I’ve seen the last of the scratched DVDs that are all too readily found buried in the strangest places around the house.

 This week on TTR

  • It’s time to re visit email again – to pop or not to pop, that’s the question.
  • Microsoft denies Windows 7 was modeled on Mac OS.
  • Twitter suspends its retweet service and
  • We look at syncing devices such as Apples iPhone for free.